Collectors State Why Archaeologists Will Never Put an End to Artifact Collecting

The disagreements between professional archaeologists and artifact collectors have existed for decades. That is a very long time.  In fact, over that long span of time, it is arguable that both sides have been losing and losing badly in their struggles with each other—while the archaeological record swirls down the drain from lack of peace, unity, cooperation, and collaboration. This page offers artifact collectors an opportunity to tell professional archaeologists the reasons why professional archaeologists are losing their struggle against artifact collecting and why they are never going to win it. Why are we asking collectors to do this?  Well, no peace or cooperation is ever possible if one side or the other side feels so powerful that it has no incentives to come to the negotiation table.  This is your chance to spell out to professional archaeologists in no uncertain terms the reasons why they are losing their current struggle against artifact collecting and why they are doomed to never win it.  Offer thoughtful, solid, defensible reasons that are likely to undermine the confidence of the other side. Please list or otherwise express your reasons in the Leave a Reply box below.

The following is an Example Collector Statement on Why Archaeologists Will Never Put an End To Collecting. This is the the general kind or type of statement(s) that we would like to see artifact collectors write into the Leave a Reply box below. Your statements can be either short or long.  That is all up to you.

Example Collector Statement on Why Archaeologists Will Never Put an End to Collecting

If the U.S. Congress and/or state legislatures pass a national and/or state ban on all artifact collecting, many of us artifact collectors will simply take our hobby underground just as beverage alcohol manufacturing and whiskey drinking were taken underground when the 18th Amendment (Prohibition) was added to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Artifact collecting is a traditional American hobby that has long enjoyed the widespread support and general approval of the American public—just like stamp and coin collecting.  We believe that any such abolition law would be an intrinsically unjust and unAmerican law that would require political and social resistance before and after the fact—as well as widespread civil disobedience.  All professional archaeologists need to understand that we love artifact collecting as much as we love life itself, and no entity is ever going to stop our collecting.  To quote the Borg, “Resistance is futile.”

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