Archaeologists State Why Artifact Collecting Will Be Put to an End

The disagreements between professional archaeologists and artifact collectors have existed for decades.  That is a very long time.  In fact, over that long span of time, it is arguable that both sides have been losing and losing badly in their struggles with each other—while the archaeological record swirls down the drain from lack of peace, unity, and cooperation. This page offers professional archaeologists an opportunity to tell artifact collectors the reasons why artifact collectors are losing their struggle to keep on collecting artifacts and why they are never going to win it.  Why are we asking archaeologists to do this?  Well, no peace or cooperation is ever possible if one side or the other side feels so powerful that it has no incentives to come to the negotiation table. This is your chance to spell out to artifact collectors in no uncertain terms the reasons why they are losing their struggle to keep on collecting artifacts and why they are doomed to never win it.   Offer thoughtful, solid, defensible reasons that are likely to undermine the confidence of the other side.  Please list or otherwise express your reasons in the Leave a Reply box below.

The following is an Example Professional Archaeology Statement on Why Archaeologists Will Put an End To Artifact Collecting. This is the general kind or type of statement(s) that we would like to see thoughtful professional archaeologists write into the Leave a Reply box below.  Your statements can be either short or long.  That is all up to you.

Example Professional Archaeology Statement on Why Archaeologists Will Put an End to Collecting

Professional archaeologists are M.A. and Ph.D. experts in American archaeology.  The President, U.S. Congress, state governors, and state legislators will listen to us and take us seriously when we advise them that artifact collecting is destroying the archaeological sites that are the limited and irreplaceable physical manifestations of the American past.  Elected government officials will always take the word of a formally trained technical expert over a butcher, baker, or candlestick maker who collects artifacts.  It just takes time.  We were successful in getting artifact collecting banned on federal lands, Native American lands, and state lands—as well as in federal waters and some state waters.  The halls of political power may not be listening to us right now, which is why artifact collecting continues on privately owned lands, but eventually we will convince elected officials of the negative effects all artifact collecting has on our American heritage, and they will pass legislation to outlaw all artifact collecting in the United States.

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One Response to Archaeologists State Why Artifact Collecting Will Be Put to an End

  1. “The halls of political power may not be listening to us right now, which is why artifact collecting continues on privately owned lands, but eventually we will convince elected officials of the negative effects all artifact collecting has on our American heritage, and they will pass legislation to outlaw all artifact collecting in the United States.”

    Due to the constitutional protections for private property, I seriously doubt that. But if you were to be successful, the backlash against your profession would label you as an elitist group that desires to keep history from the general public and limit the private property rights of citizens. This would not be to your advantage. Moreover, many of the sites we hunt are of little (if any) interest to professional archaeologists. In the first place, not a lot of private property owners (farmers and homeowners) would be interested in allowing a full scale archaeological dig on their property, with all the bureaucracy and intrusion that involves. Compared to a lone person with a metal detector digging a few holes, the contrast is rather stark. Secondly, I don’t think most archaeologists are interested in digging Civil War bullets from small camps or limited battles on private property. Lastly, you folks require lots of money in the form of grants, etc. We do not. We dig simply for the pleasure and passion of saving a little history and sharing that with the landowners and subsequent generations of Americans.

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